Making Multimedia, Webex, and Websites Accessible

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Need to check the material you’ve created for accessibility?

Learn how to use various accessibility checkers by visiting the “Checking for Accessibility” page.

You can also download accessibility checklists:

Follow these how-to guides to make sure your multimedia, presentations, websites, and forms are accessible to everyone. To view any of the Google Slides tutorials larger, click the full-size icon ( full size icon from google slides ) underneath each embedded presentation. You can use the arrows and play buttons ( back arrow, play triangle symbol, forward arrow ) or pause button ( pause button showing 2 parallel lines ) to proceed at your own pace.

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Multimedia

Creating Accessible Videos

In this how-to guide, users will learn how to make accessible videos. Our online courses typically offer video either synchronously or asynchronously for our students to view. In this guide, you will learn how to prepare your videos while making sure they are designed for all students and users of your course content.

What will be learned?

Participants will learn how to create accessible videos.

Why is it important?

Because video content often is used to deliver instruction, understanding accessibility for the video format is crucial in an online learning setting.

Who benefits?

This benefits students who are differently abled but also benefits all students through universal design.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Creating Accessible Videos” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Creating Transcripts

This how-to guide will teach you how to create transcripts for your audio and/or video recordings. It will provide specific steps as well as key tips to follow.

Why is it important?

A transcript can be very useful to the author because it allows the production process to flow smoothly. It can also make captioning your content much easier and could eliminate the need for audio description (if descriptive language is used appropriately).

From the user’s perspective, transcripts allow for a better user experience because they aid the learning process. They also provide users with visual or hearing disabilities additional access to your content.

Who benefits?

Authors of audio/video content as well as all users can benefit from transcripts, but deaf and hard-of-hearing viewers as well as users with visual impairments benefit most from transcripts.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Creating Transcripts” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


DIY Captioning using Automated Captions

Learn how to use the automated captions (with editing) feature for recorded videos using Canvas, Panopto, YouTube and Zoom.

Why is it important?

Captioning videos ensures that anyone who needs to access your content is able to do so, which will increase your ability to reach larger audiences. Using automated captions makes it easier to add captions yourself rather than paying a vendor to do it.  However, properly editing automated captions is extremely important to ensure captions are at least 99% accurate.

Who benefits?

Users who have a hearing impairment (deaf, hard of hearing, and others) directly benefit from captioning since it can take replace the audio heard in the video. Among the hearing community, captioning allows your video to be accessed in both noisy and quiet environments. Captioning also helps ESL users understand audio content, and research has shown that captioning improves comprehension and retention for all users.

Resources

Canvas Logo

Automated Captions in Canvas


Panopto VideoAutomated Captions in Panopto

Automated Transcription in Zoom

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Using Auto Captioning for YouTube Videos” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Caption Your Videos Using Amara Software

Learn how to upload your transcript and caption your own videos using Amara software.

Why is it important?

Captioning videos ensures that anyone who needs to access your content is able to do so, which will increase your ability to reach larger audiences.

Who benefits?

Users with a hearing impairment (deaf, hard of hearing, and others) directly benefit from captioning since it can take the place of the audio heard in the video. Among the hearing community, captioning allows your video to be accessed in both noisy and quiet environments. Also, captioning helps ESL users understand verbal content, and research has shown that captioning improves comprehension and retention for all users.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Caption Your Videos Using Amara Software (without transcript)” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Caption Your Videos Using Amara Software (with transcript)” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Webex

Using the Closed Captionist Role in Webex

Learn how to use the Closed Captionist role in your Webex Meetings sessions, so that a transcriptionist can type what is spoken by a presenter during a Webex meeting.

Why is it important?

Captioning videos ensures that anyone who needs to participate in your Webex session is able to do so, instead of relying on a captioned session recording later. Your ability to include more individuals in your session increases the relevance of your session, especially regarding your ability to include all members in the active discussion.

Who benefits?

Users with a hearing impairment (deaf, hard of hearing, and others) directly benefit from live closed captioning as it replaces the audio portion of the Webex session. Among the hearing community, captioning allows your session to be accessed in both noisy and quiet environments. Captioning also helps ESL users understand the auditory content, and research has shown that captioning improves comprehension and retention for all users.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Using the Closed Captionist Role in WebEx” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Using the Closed Captionist Role in WebEx (sessions in Canvas)” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Downloading Recorded Webex Sessions to Prepare for Captioning

Learn how to download (and potentially convert) a recorded Webex session so that you can prepare it for captioning.

Why is it important?

In order to caption a video, it first needs to be downloaded to the user’s system in an appropriate format (MP4).

Who benefits?

Outside of the benefits of captioning a video in general, this task simplifies and makes possible the captioning process. The instructor will benefit from this procedure since the video will be in the proper location and format for use in captioning. Users who have a hearing impairment (deaf, hard of hearing, and others) directly benefit from captioning.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Downloading Recorded Webex Sessions to Prepare for Captioning” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Downloading Recorded Webex Sessions to Prepare for Captioning (for sessions via Canvas)” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Using the Zoom Controls in Webex

Learn to use the zoom-in, zoom-out, and synchronize features in Webex, so that individual zoom levels on shared content can be controlled effectively.

Why is it important?

Users may need to look at documents or other shared content at a higher zoom level in order to comprehend and interact with it. Providing this functionality allows users to control the size/portion of the document they are seeing so that their experience is most meaningful to them individually.

Who benefits?

Users who have a visual impairment requiring enlarged text would benefit greatly from this feature, as they would be able to follow the document along better at a higher level of zoom. Other users may potentially be more comfortable with slightly enlarged fonts or a slightly higher level of zoom, even without impairment or reduced visual functionality.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Using the Zoom Controls in Webex” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.

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Websites

Creating Accessible Canvas Pages

This how-to guide will teach users how to create Canvas pages that are accessible to all users. It covers the basic elements of accessibility, including accessible document structure, media, images, math/scientific equations, and more.

Why is it important?

Accessible Canvas pages mean that all users will have access to your information. Also, planning for accessibility during a course’s design phase is less time consuming than remediating a course after it’s been designed because a user found it inaccessible.

Who benefits?

All users benefit, but users with disabilities benefit the most. Course designers also benefit from not running the risk of creating an inaccessible course that has to be remediated after a student reports that it doesn’t work.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Creating Accessible Canvas Pages” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.


Creating Accessible WordPress Sites

Learn how to make WordPress websites inclusive to as many users as possible through theme selection, design, navigation, semantic markup, hyperlinks, and image descriptions.

Why is it important?

Creating an accessible WordPress website will allow the widest possible audience to experience the site.

Who benefits?

The creator of an accessible WordPress site demonstrates proactive consideration for the audience, shows professionalism in meeting up-to-date website design standards, meets federal standards to avoid negative consequences, and improves search engine optimization by giving search engines information in alt and title tags.

Ultimately, making a WordPress site accessible allows more people to operate the website successfully.

To access this presentation as a PDF, download “Creating Accessible WordPress Sites” and open it in Adobe Acrobat.

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